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Print edition: October 2002

Features

Let the quantum games begin

Quantum mechanics is providing new insights into game theory

Optical tweezers: the next generation

The remote control of matter with lasers has had a major impact in physics and biology, and researchers can now construct new materials

New directions with fewer dimensions

Physicists are learning to how move and manipulate electrons in one- and zero-dimensional systems

Optical tweezers: the next generation

The ability to remotely control matter with lasers has had a major impact in physics and biology, and has now reached the point where researchers can construct new types of material

New directions with fewer dimensions

Physicists are learning how to move and manipulate electrons in one-and zero-dimensional systems, which could lead to a new generation of electronic devices

Physics in Action

Charmed particles at the double

Doubly charmed baryons have puzzled particle physicists

One-way transport in quantum dots

Physicists have built a novel device that relies on electron spin to rectify current

When electrons decay into spin and charge

Experiments on organic conductors have provided direct evidence of spin-charge separation in one-dimensional conductors

Electron antibunching finally made beautiful

The Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect - a classic experiment in quantum optics - has been observed with free electrons for the first time

One-way transport in quantum dots

A novel device that relies on electron spin can rectify electric current

When electrons decay into spin and charge

Experiments on organic conductors have provided direct evidence of the long-sought phenomenon of spin-charge separation in one-dimensional conductors

Electron antibunching finally made beautiful

The Hanbury-Brown and Twiss effect - one of the classic experiments in quantum optics - has been observed with free electrons for the first time

Post-deadline

Anti-atoms in numbers

Hands-free writing is made easy on the eye

Iron-45 nuclei reveal novel two-proton decay process

News & Analysis

Europe to launch gamma probe

Anger greets reform plans

Dutch face pupil crisis

Long gone

Students challenged by new approach

Cosmic microwaves reveal polarization

UK weapons lab targets new facilities

With testing banned, the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston is having to adopt alternative strategies to ensure the UK's nuclear weapons are safe.

Ireland rewards physicists

Livermore lab celebrates first 50 years

Created in the early days of the Cold War, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US has greatly expanded its mission since then and has now been selected to take the lead role on issues of "homeland security".

Bush faces pressure to boost funding

Italian firm eyes up space

Labs face threat of closure

Editorial

Hanging together

Is physics in crisis?

Forum

Have you heard the rumour mill?

Websites containing gossip about academic jobs can boost your career.

Critical Point

Manufacturing firsts in physics

The first collisions at accelerators tend to be stage managed

Reviews

The Hundred Greatest Stars, James Kaler

Agnes Mary Clerke and the Rise of Astrophysics, Marian Bruck

A colourful picture of particles

Careers

Career options for graduates

Lateral Thoughts

The wrong stuff