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About this event

Web site
royalsociety.org/e…
When
13 Feb 2013
Where
London, United Kingdom
Organiser
The Royal Society
Contact address
Rose Cooper-Thorne
United Kingdom
E-mail
events@royalsociety.org…

Lecture/talk

From logic to computer science: a linguistic journey

6.30-7.30pm Wednesday 13th February

Artificial languages gave rise to one of the great intellectual endeavours of the 20th century. They came to maturity in mathematical logic, around the 30's, in pursuit of metamathematics, the mathematics of mathematics. The first modern programming languages arose in the 50's; they made it possible to write today's complex software systems, which perform the myriad tasks we all now rely on.

The study of artificial languages forms a fascinating mix of science and engineering. Professor Plotkin will look at this story, and the interplay between logic and computer science, explaining what it takes to understand an artificial language. As well as its syntax, its form, one must also give an account of its semantics, its meaning, itself tied intimately to its use. He will illustrate what can be done in computer science using semantical methods, and speculate on what else may be done. Finally, he will ask what the future developments of artificial languages may be, and look at a 21st century example, where they are beginning to be used in systems and synthetic biology, itself part of a broader movement connecting computer science and biology.

This event is free to attend and open to all. No tickets are required. Doors open at 6pm and seats will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis.