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Medical physics

Three steps to safer stereotactic radiotherapy

20 May 2021 Sponsored by PTW Dosimetry School

Available to watch now, PTW Dosimetry School explores best practices in dosimetry and QA for stereotactic radiotherapy

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In recent years, stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) has evolved into standard practice in radiation oncology. SRT of small targets using high dose per fraction with steep dose fall-off requires a comprehensive quality assurance programme to ensure that the prescribed dose is accurately delivered. However, dosimetry is still one of the major challenges faced by many clinical physicists when embarking on SRT.

In this educational webinar, Hui Khee Looe will touch on three important aspects of SRT:

  • Beam commissioning
  • Patient-specific plan QA
  • End-to-end tests

He will address the most frequently asked questions on each of these aspects and provide practical tips and step-by-step guides. Special focus will be placed on common pitfalls and how to avoid them. These will be illustrated by using real clinical cases to help understanding.

Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.” (Marie Curie)

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Hui Khee Looe received his Master’s degree and PhD in physics from the University of Oldenburg. He is currently deputy head of the Department of Medical Physics at Pius Hospital, where he is responsible for clinical duties in the Clinics for Radiotherapy, Nuclear Medicine and Radiology. In addition, he is a university lecturer and leader of the research group Computational Methods in Modern Dosimetry at Carl von Ossietzky University. Hui Khee has published more than 40 peer-reviewed papers. His research activities focus on dosimetry under non-equilibrium conditions, the development of mathematical models for modern dosimetry, dosimetry in magnetic fields, and multi-dimensional dose measurements.

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